Happy Birthday – Stephen King

While researching the latest bulletin board – Next Monday starts Banned Books Week – I discovered that today is Stephen King’s birthday. 
Happy Birthday to yooooouuuu Mr. King.   
The HotLibraryTech will refrain from turning your greeting into a video complete with the birthday song because, well quite frankly, that would be too scary for even you. 

Besides all the novels that Mr. King has written, he has another  “claim to fame” with the honor that he has twenty-two count them, 22 books listed in the research guide entitled Banned Books by Robert P. Doyle. 

This resource guide for librarians and technicians is invaluable.  We have to put a “Do not remove from library” sticker on the cover so that it stays on the counter.  Every fall, students receive an assignment in their 10th grade English classes to check out and read a “Banned Book” from the library.  We appreciate the boost in our library circulation as fresh-faced little sophomores come looking for a book for their assignment.  They usually look for the ‘skinny’ books – a fast read – but then the teachers started telling them that they would have to read two books.  Kids often check out Christine or Carrie for this assignment.  This year, a few students picked up It and Pet Sematary

In case, I have made you curious, here are some of the reasons that these books by Mr. King were, challenged, restricted, banned or “placed on a special shelf.”  Just makes them all the more desirable in this humble Library Tech’s opinion. 

Christine:  In Alabama, (1985) the board of education voted unanimously to ban the novel from all county school libraries because the book contains “unacceptable language'” and is “pornographic.”  (Bet the public libraries in the county saw a jump in their circulation stats….)

Carrie:  Challenged in a high school library in Las Vegas (1975) because it is “trash.”  Placed in a ‘special closed shelf’ at a Vermont high school library (1978) because it could “harm students, particularly younger girls.”

It:  Challenged in the Lincoln, Nebraska school libraries (1987) because of the novel’s corruptive, obscene nature.” Placed on a ‘closed shelf; at the Franklinville, New York Central high school library (1992) because of explicit sexual acts, violence and profane language.  Students will need parental permission to check it out.  (Seriously, I read this book while my husband was under going cancer treatments – the book was a ‘walk in the park’ compared to what I was going thru.)

Pet Sematary:  Challenged, along with eight other Stephen King novels, in North Dakota (1994) by a local minister and school board member, because of “age appropriateness.”

The library is a flurry of activity now with students checking out the book they have picked for their project.  I just love it when they wait until the last minute…..I look at them and smile when I see the choice for their assignment, I say, “This one’s scary, hope you have a nightlight!”

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Explore posts in the same categories: Banned Books, Books, Bulletin Boards, Bulletin Boards on a Budget, High School Libraries, HotLibraryTech, Librarian, Librarians, Library, Library Technicians, Read, Reading, Stephen King, Teenagers

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